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Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous And How It Begun


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. Alcoholics Anonymous provides moral support to people that are trying to stop alcoholism and it started its operation in 1935. The two founders compiled the twelve steps to direct AA meetings; later they introduced the 12 traditions to help better define the aims of the group. The 12 Steps are still followed, and many recovered alcoholics say belonging to an AA group saw them through the recovery journey.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What Happens At An Aa Meeting

Arriving at the decision to go to an AA meeting can be scary and very uncomfortable, especially for people who don't realise what to expect from it. Opening up about your condition to people that you have just met is always the hard part for the new members. It is fortunate that every AA attendee understands your feelings exactly. The original model is still in use today and it helps that the organisation was started by recovering alcoholics who understood the challenge. Sharing a common experience of being alcoholics is what makes AA successful in its objective and mission.


At each AA meeting, the attendees are welcomed to join the group. The best way to recover is through opening up about your journey but it is not mandatory to speak in the meetings. The meeting participants know from experience that a new member may not find talking about themselves readily at first. After some time, they start feeling at home and find tremendous relief and healing through openly sharing their experiences.


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Closed Vs Open Gatherings

Only the people that are struggling with alcohol addiction are the ones allowed to attend the closed meetings in AA.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. Depending on your comfort level, you can choose to either attend the open or closed meetings. Some individuals want to keep these meetings as a separate part from the other activities. These meetings can provide alcoholics the support needed by their loved ones and many are known to gain from this benefit.


The Twelve Steps For Aa

The 12 steps which originated from Alcoholics Anonymous are presently the standards which are applied by all addiction recovery groups. The steps are meant to be followed as a cycle although they are listed linearly. Some of the steps mentioned could be revisited until the recovering alcoholic is comfortable during that stage of their recovery process.

One starts with acknowledging they are having a problem and they cannot solve it on their own. Admitting and accepting your mistakes, making an effort to correct these errors and deciding to always try and improve are some of the steps that follow. Here is ore information about the 12 stages of recovery.


Objections To Aa

Since attending AA meetings may bring discomfort, so many people will find reasons not to attend such meetings. Most of the times, people avoid these meetings because:

  • They doubt that attending the meeting will help
  • They do not want to risk meeting someone they know
  • They do not accept they have a problem

Rather than concentrate on the excuses despite having a feeling that they are enormous people who are nervous about attending a meeting should focus on the reasons why they are considering this organisation in the first place.

Accepting your condition and seeking help is the main objective. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


Aa Groups Near You

The AA groups are widespread everywhere and you will definitely find one near you. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. Make up your mind what kind of group you want to join, closed or open, then go through our online meeting finder to locate one near you. If you're looking for an AA group, we can assist you to find one just contact 0800 246 1509.